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Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

5 edition of The long-winded lady found in the catalog.

The long-winded lady

notes from the New Yorker.

by Maeve Brennan

  • 155 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by Morrow in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • New York (N.Y.)
    • Subjects:
    • Brennan, Maeve -- Homes and haunts -- New York (State) -- New York,
    • New York (N.Y.) -- Fiction

    • Classifications
      LC ClassificationsPR6052.R413 L66 1969
      The Physical Object
      Pagination237 p.
      Number of Pages237
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5754088M
      LC Control Number71085131

      Discover a vivid, atmospheric portrait of mid-century Manhattan with this collection of “Talk of the Town” pieces from the pages of The New Yorker.. During the s and s, Maeve Brennan contributed numerous vignettes to the New Yorker’s ”Talk of the Town” department, under the pen name “The Long-Winded Lady.”. Her unforgettable sketches—prose snapshots of life in small Brand: Counterpoint Press. The New Yorker, August 4, P. Long-winded lady account of the man who does the right thing in the right place at the right time & "knows" it. He was at the Grosvenor bar, sitting at the.

      A collection of articles about The Long Winded Lady from The New Yorker, including news, in-depth reporting, commentary, and analysis. The Long-Winded Lady by Maeve Brennan, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5().

      Find items like The Long-Winded Lady and read 1 review with a 5/5 star rating at Bas Bleu. From to , Irish-born Maeve Brennan wrote utterly delightful sketches for The New Yorker's "Talk of the Town" column under the pen name "The Long-Winded Lady." Collected here are more than fifty such vignettes, capturing quirky snapshots of ordinary life in New York City of yesteryear.5/5(1). The long-winded lady writes: During the recent heat wave, all air ceased to flow through the streets of New York City. On the dreadful afternoon of Sun., July 3rd, the lady was in the Adano.


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The long-winded lady by Maeve Brennan Download PDF EPUB FB2

First published inThe Long-Winded Lady is a celebration of one of The New Yorker’s finest writers at the height of her power. As contemporary culture revisits with new appreciation the pioneering female voices of the past century, Maeve Brennan remains a writer whose dazzling work continues to embolden a new generation/5(11).

A charming and bitter-sweet set of essays, The Long-Winded Lady brings together dozens of Irish-born Maeve Brennan's contributions to The New Yorker.

Mostly written during the s and s, they are vignettes of a long-vanished city in transition, as brownstone houses and small businesses were sacrificed to what Brennan terms "the God of Office Space."/5.

Her sketches of life in Times Square and Greenwich Village ran under Brennans ``Long-Winded Lady'' pseudonym from to No other writer has so subtly or effectively captured ``the ordinary ways'' of the city's denizens.5/5(2).

Her sketches of life in Times Square and Greenwich Village ran under Brennans ``Long-Winded Lady'' pseudonym from The long-winded lady book No other writer has so subtly or effectively captured ``the ordinary ways'' of the city's denizens/5(18).

The Long-Winded Lady: Notes from The New Yorker Hardcover – January 1, by Maeve Brennan (Author)/5(18). “Maeve Brennan’s act of rebellion, as the long-winded lady, was to write New York as the city of a woman with ordinary things The long-winded lady book do in the morning and with a love, in the mid-afternoon, of sitting by herself in little restaurants, staring at people, eavesdropping on their conversations while pretending to be absorbed in a book.

Long Winded Lady Notes From the New York Hardcover – January 1, by Maeve Brennan (Author) › Visit Amazon's Maeve Brennan Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

See search results for this author. Are you an author. Learn about Author Central /5(18). Discover a vivid, atmospheric portrait of mid-century Manhattan with this collection of “Talk of the Town” pieces from the pages of The New Yorker. During the s and s, Maeve Brennan contributed numerous vignettes to the New Yorker’s ”Talk of the Town” department, under the pen name “The Long-Winded Lady.”.

Buy The Long-winded Lady: Notes from The New Yorker Reissue by Brennan, Maeve (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders/5(18).

The Long-Winded Lady: Notes from The New Yorker | Brennan Maeve | download | B–OK. Download books for free. Find books. The long-winded lady Item Preview remove-circle Internet Archive Contributor Internet Archive Language English.

Access-restricted-item true Addeddate Boxid IA Internet Archive Books. Scanned in China. Uploaded by Unknown on January 3, SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata) Pages: The Long-Winded Lady was Brennan's byline from The New Yorker from to Forty-seven of those pieces were published in book form in under the title The Long-Winded Lady.

This publication contains all forty-seven of those with nine additional pieces that first appeared in The New Yorker subsequent to that date. The long-winded lady; notes from the New Yorker Item Preview Internet Archive Contributor Internet Archive Language English.

Access-restricted-item true Addeddate Internet Archive Books. American Libraries. Uploaded by loader-DanaB on Pages:   Our June Book a Month selection, The Long-Winded Lady, is a collection of sketches written primarily for The New Yorker’s “Talk of the Town” column by Irish immigrant Maeve Brennan.

Under the pen name “The Long-Winded Lady,” Brennan deftly captures scenes and vignettes of everyday occurrences in New York City, startling in their clarity, and mundane moments that nonetheless.

First published inThe Long-Winded Lady is a celebration of one of The New Yorker's finest writers at the height of her power. As contemporary culture revisits with new appreciation the pioneering female voices of the past century, Maeve Brennan remains a writer whose dazzling work continues to embolden a new generation.

show more4/5(). A delightfully satisfactory revelation--and yet not really surprising--that the Long-Winded Lady of The New Yorker's Talk of the Town is Maeve Brennan, author of last year's In and Out of Never-Never Land.

Long-Winded Lady tells about a couple of encounters with a drunk woman. The woman was standing on an traffic island in the middle of Bway. & 45th St. She was singing "Bie mier vist du schon" at the. First published inThe Long-Winded Lady is a celebration of one of The New Yorker's finest writers at the height of her power.

As contemporary culture revisits with new appreciation the pioneering female voices of the past century, Maeve Brennan remains a writer whose dazzling work continues to embolden a new generation/5(18). Dating mostly from the s, these “moments of recognition,” as she called them, are delicately crafted summonings of a New York City that has mostly disappeared.

Her sketches of life in Times Square and Greenwich Village ran under Brennan’s “Long-Winded Lady” pseudonym from to For nearly three decades she wrote for The New Yorker's Talk of the Town section under the woefully apt pseudonym the Long-Winded Lady.

In her vignettes of city life she natters about little things like yappy dogs, or dinner at her favorite steakhouse, where a stranger had the veal, or the weather, which came in three flavors -- heat wave. First published inThe Long-Winded Lady is a celebration of one of The New Yorker's finest writers at the height of her power.

As contemporary culture revisits with new appreciation the pioneering female voices of the past century, Maeve Brennan remains a writer whose dazzling work continues to embolden a new generation.The Long-Winded Lady, her writings from The New Yorker, is not easy reading.

It is the third time I have read these pieces and for me they remain unsettling, and a bit too : Eileen Battersby.From toMaeve Brennan contributed to The New Yorker's "Talk of the Town" department under the pen name "the long-winded lady." Her unforgettable sketches - prose snapshots of life in the streets, diners, and cheap hotels just off Times Square - are a timeless, bittersweet tribute to what she calls the "most ambitious, most comical the saddest and coldest and most human of cities."5/5(4).